Wisdom Beat

Eclectic wisdom research

“A hidden island of value-based decisions” from BrainEthics

“A hidden island of value-based decisions” is a post on BrainEthics blog about “one of the new trends in decision making research” – “an extension of the somatic market theory and the role of ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPfC), Bechara and colleagues have recently demonstrated how the role of the insula seems to play an important role in decision making involving risk and aversion.”

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April 15, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Blog posts | 1 Comment

The Necessity Of Experiences by Miss Ghaliah

This is a short post about the role that experience plays in personal development.

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April 15, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Blog posts | Leave a comment

“The unclear boundary between human and robot” from Mind Hacks

This is a post from Mind Hacks blog about a letter published in Nature about “coming robot war” and controlling thoughts with machines.

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April 15, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Blog posts | 1 Comment

“This is Your Brain on the Edge of Chaos” from Neuronarrative

This is a short post that compares the structure of human brain to natural phenomena, such as earthquakes or piles of sand.

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April 14, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Blog posts | Leave a comment

“H. Sapiens Digital: From Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom” from The Wisdom Page

“H. Sapiens Digital: From Digital Immigrants and Digital Natives to Digital Wisdom” by Marc Prensky is an article about digital technology and digital wisdom.

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April 5, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Articles | Leave a comment

An Appeal for Practical Wisdom from Neuronarrative

This is a video of Barry Schwartz speaking about the appeal of practical wisdom in opposition of bureaucracy.

“Aristotle said that practical wisdom is the combination of “moral will and moral skill.” In this TED lecture, psychologist Barry Schwartz makes an engaging appeal for practical wisdom as an antidote to a society gone mad with bureaucracy (”a society at war with wisdom”). He argues powerfully that rules often fail us, incentives often backfire, and practical, everyday wisdom will help rebuild our world. Roughly 20 minutes long and well worth the time.”

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April 2, 2009 Posted by | Videos and Podcasts, Wisdom Blog posts | Leave a comment

Wising Up from Alan Nordstrom’s Blog

This is short blog post by Alan Nordstrom, in which he questions the ways to visualize of wisdom.

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April 2, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Blog posts | Leave a comment

Guest Column: Computers vs. Brains from the NY Times

This is a short article in the New York times written by Sandra Aamodt and Sam Wang about the key differences between robots and human brain. The writers argue that it will not be possible for artificial intelligence to become substitutes for humans in the near future due to those differences.

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April 2, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Articles | Leave a comment

“Howard McClusky: A Wise and Good Man” from The Wisdom Page

This is an article by Walter G. Moss about Howard McClusky:
“Perhaps the wisest person I have ever had much interaction with was Howard McClusky (1900-1982). He was a consultant to a National Endowment for the Humanities project that I (then in my mid-thirties) directed in the years 1973-1975 on Gerontology and the Humanities. ”

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April 2, 2009 Posted by | Wisdom Articles | Leave a comment

“Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom” from The Wisdom Page

Science and the Pursuit of Wisdom: Studies in the Philosophy of Nicholas Maxwell
Leemon McHenry (Ed.)
Published by Ontos Verlag, Frankfurt-Heusenstamm. www.ontosverlag.com
February 2009. ISBN: 978-3-86838-028-6

Publisher’s Back Cover Description:

“Nicholas Maxwell’s provocative and highly-original philosophy of science urges a revolution in academic inquiry affecting all branches of learning, so that the single-minded pursuit of knowledge is replaced with the aim of helping people realize what is of value in life and make progress toward a more civilized world. This volume of essays from an international, interdisciplinary group of scholars engages Maxwell in critical evaluation and celebrates his contribution to philosophy spanning forty years. Several of the contributors, like Maxwell, took their inspiration from Sir Karl Popper’s philosophy of science and were connected to the department he created at the London School of Economics. In the introductory chapter, Maxwell provides an overview of his thought and then defends his views against objections in a concluding essay.”

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April 1, 2009 Posted by | Book Reviews | Leave a comment